Summer 2021 Assignments - Mercy High School

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Summer 2021 Assignments

Summer Reading Assignments

Dear Families:

To help your daughter become truly learned and increase her standing among the many students with whom she will compete for college placement, Mercy's English Department requires that she continue to read and think over the summer. As a Mercy student, your daughter will be expected to have read, fully annotated, and to have her own copy of the text/s assigned for her English course. All texts should be in hard copy form (no e-books) and match the ISBN provided. These texts should be independently purchased by each student (they are not available through e-campus). Each student, unless otherwise noted under their course assignment, should complete the following assignment for each summer reading text:

English Summer Reading Assignment: Read and Annotate:

In the margins or on post-it notes in the text, students should have annotations that ask questions, make significant thematic related comments, and significant literary observations, connections, as well note specific literary devices. Students should NOT merely underline or highlight the text, instead students should provide meaningful annotations with special attention given to literary elements and devices other than just characterization. These include but are not limited to setting, point of view, conflict/plot structure, stylistic elements (diction, imagery, details, syntax, personification, repetition, metaphor, irony, etc.) which are all used to create effects, ideas, and/or convey a purpose.


 9th Grade- Language and Literature I (CP & Honors)

(see assignment description above)

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd 


10th Grade – Language and Literature II

(see assignment description above)

Lang and Lit II CP:

House on Mango Street, by Sandra Cisneros

Honors:

House on Mango Street, by Sandra Cisneros

Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston



11th Grade – Language and Literature III (CP & Honors)

(see assignment description above)

-Chronicle of a Death Foretold - Gabriel Garcia Marquez ISBN 978-1400034710

______________________________________________

11th Grade AP Language and Composition

(see assignment description above)

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, by Frederick Douglass ISBN 978-0451529947

In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote ISBN 978-0679745587

12th Grade - Language and Literature IV (CP & Honors)

(see assignment description above)

Oedipus the King, by Sophocles translated by David Grene (ISBN 978-0226768687)

12th Grade - AP Literature and Composition 

Please purchase these books and annotate, per the assignment above. You will be writing about these books as the year goes on.

  1. Read How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster
  2. Choose one novel from list A. Do not select one you have read in class.
  3. Choose one play from this list B. Do not select one you have read in class.

 

LIST A-- Novels

Sort by:   # of Years Cited   Title   Author

Invisible Man — Ralph Ellison (08,09,10,11,12,13,15,16)

Beloved — Toni Morrison (09,10,11,14,15,16,17)

Wuthering Heights — Emily Bronte (08,10,12,15,16,17)

Great Expectations — Charles Dickens (08,10,12,13,15,17)

Their Eyes Were Watching God — Zora Neale Hurston

(08,10,11,13,14,17)

Heart of Darkness — Joseph Conrad (09,10,11,12,15,16)

Jane Eyre — Charlotte Bronte (08,10,13,16,17)

The Grapes of Wrath — John Steinbeck (09,10,11,12,13)

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man — James Joyce

(08,09,10,11,13)

Oryx and Crake — Margaret Atwood (12,14,16,17)

Catch-22 — Joseph Heller (08,11,15,16)

The Kite Runner — Khaled Hosseini (08,09,15,16)

Pride and Prejudice — Jane Austen (08,11,12,16)

Crime and Punishment — Fyodor Dostoyevsky

(09,10,11,16)

Cat's Eye — Margaret Atwood (08,09,13,15)

The Poisonwood Bible — Barbara Kingsolver (10,11,12,14)

All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy #1) — Cormac McCarthy (08,10,11,13)

Frankenstein — Mary Shelley (08,15,17)

The Mayor of Casterbridge — Thomas Hardy (10,11,17)

Brave New World — Aldous Huxley (09,10,17)

The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2 — Henry James

(11,14,16)

The Memory Keeper's Daughter — Kim Edwards (09,14,16)

Atonement — Ian McEwan (11,13,16)

Jude the Obscure — Thomas Hardy (09,10,16)

Madame Bovary — Gustave Flaubert (09,10,16)

Never Let Me Go — Kazu Ishiguro (09,10,16)

Tess of the d'Urbervilles — Thomas Hardy (12,14,15)

Black Boy — Richard Wright (08,13,15)

Sister Carrie — Theodore Dreiser (09,10,15)

The Age of Innocence — Edith Wharton (08,12,14)

The God of Small Things — Arundhati Roy (10,11,13)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn — Mark Twain

(08,11,13)

The Namesake — Jhumpa Lahiri (09,10,13)

The House on Mango Street — Sandra Cisneros (08,10,13)

Native Son — Richard Wright (09,11,12)

My Antonia — Willa Cather (08,10,12)

Sula — Toni Morrison (08,10,12)

All the King's Men — Robert Penn Warren (08,09,11)

A Prayer for Owen Meany — John Irving (14,17)

Light in August — William Faulkner (11,17)

Tom Jones — Henry Fielding (08,17)

The Blind Assassin — Margaret Atwood (11,16)

The Bonesetter's Daughter — Amy Tan (11,16)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest — Ken Kesey (12,15)

Oliver Twist — Charles Dickens (09,15)

Sophie's Choice — William Styron (09,15)

Billy Budd — Herman Melville (08,15)

Lord of the Flies — William Golding (08,15)

The Red Badge of Courage — Stephen Crane (08,15)

A Thousand Acres — Jane Smiley (11,14)

A Tale of Two Cities — Charles Dickens (08,14)

The Story of Edgar Sawtelle — David Wroblewski (11,13)

A Thousand Splendid Suns — Khaled Hosseini (11,13)

Jasmine — Bharati Mukherjee (10,13)

Song of Solomon — Toni Morrison (10,13)

The Chosen — Chaim Potok (08,13)

The Sound and the Fury — William Faulkner (08,13)

The Woman Warrior — Maxine Hong Kingston (08,13)

Absalom, Absalom! — William Faulkner (10,12)

Another Country — James Baldwin (10,12)

Snow Falling on Cedars — David Guterson (10,12)

Ceremony — Leslie Marmon Silko (09,12)

A Passage to India — E.M. Forster (09,12)

The Plague — Albert Camus (09,12)

As I Lay Dying — William Faulkner (09,11)

Emma — Jane Austen (08,11)

Bleak House — Charles Dickens (09,10)

Wise Blood — Flannery O'Connor (09,10)

Reservation Blues — Sherman Alexie (08,09)

 

LIST B-- Plays

King Lear —Shakespeare (08,10,11,12,14)

A Streetcar Named Desire — Tennessee Williams (08,09,10,11,14)

Othello, the Moor of Venice —Shakespeare (11,14,15,16)

The Glass Menagerie — Tennessee Williams (08,09,10,12)

Twelfth Night —Shakespeare (11,16,17)

Waiting for Godot — Samuel Beckett (09,12,17)

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? — Edward Albee (11,15,16)

M. Butterfly — David Henry Hwang (11,12,16)

A Raisin in the Sun — Lorraine Hansberry (09,12,14)

Antigone — Sophocles (09,11,14)

The Piano Lesson — August Wilson (08,10,12)

Macbeth —Shakespeare (09,17)

Much Ado About Nothing —Shakespeare (14,16)

As You Like It — William Shakespeare (10,16)

A Doll's House — Henrik Ibsen (09,16)

Medea — Euripides (11,15)

The Merchant of Venice —Shakespeare (11,15)

Death of a Salesman — Arthur Miller (12,14)

Major Barbara — George Bernard Shaw (09,11)

The Cherry Orchard — Anton Chekhov (09,10)

Fences — August Wilson (09,10)

Equus — Peter Shaffer (08,09)

Master Harold...and the Boys — Athol Fugard (08,09)

 

 

Books Cited at Least Twice in the Last 10 Years. In AP® English Literature and Composition Free-Response Questions*

French 2:

Students enrolled in French 2 for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

1. Please read Petites histoires. These include: Le Club des quatre a la Maison des jeunes, L'Enquête du club des quatre, and La Disparition d’Olivier

2. Answer to the questions at the end of each section in complete sentences in French.

3. Do all of your work on your computer or iPad.

4. I will collect your questions during the first week of classes.

Your teacher will provide a copy of the work electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language.


French 3 Honors:

Students enrolled in French 3 Honors for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

1. Please read Drôle de mission.

2. Answer to the questions at the end of each section in complete sentences in French.

3. Do all of your work on your computer or iPad.

4. I will collect your questions during the first week of classes.

Your teacher will provide a copy of the work electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language.


French 4 Honors:

Students enrolled in French 4 Honors for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

1. Please read Les yeux de Carmen.

2. Answer to the questions at the end of each section in complete sentences in French.

3. Do all of your work on your computer or iPad.

4. I will collect your questions during the first week of classes.

Your teacher will provide a copy of the work electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language.


Spanish 2 and Spanish 2 Honors:

Students enrolled in Spanish 2 and 2 Honors for the 2020-2021 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

  1. All work should be done in a separate notebook.
  2. You will read a short novel titled: Los secretos de familia that will be available to you electronically.
  3. You are responsible of annotating throughout your reading. Annotating in foreign language means creating a list of words that you do not understand and writing down their meaning in English (you should have at least five (5) words for each chapter). Note: The book includes a word bank on the back, however you must still create your own list of vocabulary words.
  4. You should answer the “Preguntas” at the end of each chapter in complete sentences.
  5. Finally, in the first week of classes, students will be responsible for an assessment of the novel based on comprehension. You will be able to use your notes on the assessment.

 

Your teacher will provide a copy of the book electronically. Please contact Ms.Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

 

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language.

 


Spanish 3 and Spanish 3 Honors:

Students enrolled in Spanish 3 and 3 Honors for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

  1. All work should be completed in a separate notebook.
  2. You will read a short novel titled: Vida o muerte en el Cusco that will be available to you electronically.
  3. You are responsible of annotating throughout your reading. Annotating in foreign language means creating a list of words that you do not understand and writing down their meaning in English (you should have at least five (5) words for each chapter).
  4. At the end of each chapter, you will write a 2-4 sentence summary (depending on the length of each chapter) in Spanish of the chapter.
  5. Finally, in the first week of classes, you will be responsible for an assessment of the novel based on comprehension.

 

Your teacher will provide a copy of the book electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (Mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy. 

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language.

 

Spanish 4 Honors

Students enrolled in Spanish 4 Honors for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

 

  1. All work should be completed in a separate notebook.
  2. You will read a short novel titled: ‘La casa en Mango Street’ that will be available to you electronically.
  3. You are responsible of annotating throughout your reading. Annotating in foreign language means creating a list of words that you do not understand and writing down their meaning in English (you should have at least five (5) words for each chapter).
  4. At the end of each chapter, you will write a 2-4 sentence summary (depending on the length of each chapter) in Spanish of the chapter.
  5. Finally, in the first week of classes, you will be responsible for an assessment of the novel based on comprehension.

 

Your teacher will provide a copy of the book electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language. 


Spanish 5 Honors

Students enrolled in Spanish 5 Honors for the 2021-2022 school year are responsible for the following summer work:

 

  1. You will read a short novel titled: ‘Las cajas de carton’ that will be available to you electronically.
  2. You are responsible of annotating throughout your reading. Annotating in foreign language means creating a list of words that you do not understand and writing down their meaning in a separate notebook. Note: The book includes a work bank on the back, however you must still create your own list of vocabulary words on a separate notebook.
  3. At the end of each chapter, you will write a 2-4 sentence summary (depending on the length of each chapter) in Spanish of the chapter.
  4. Finally, in the first week of classes, you will be responsible for an assessment of the novel based on comprehension.

Your teacher will provide a copy of the book electronically. Please contact Ms. Fetzer, World Language Department Chair (mfetzer@mercyhighschool.com) if you need a copy.

The summer assignment is designed so that students may be more successful in their upcoming academic year and further develop their vocabulary as well as to maintain the use of the language. 


9th Grade (incoming)

Biology (H) & (CP): The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

WIM: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Year 1 Neumann Scholars: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

PLTW: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot


10th Grade

IPS & Intro to Physics (H): What If by Randall Munroe

WIM: Florence Nightengale: The Courageous Life of a Legendary Nurse by Catherine Reef

Year 2 Neumann Scholars: Florence Nightengale: The Courageous Life of a Legendary Nurse by Catherine Reef

PLTW: N/A


11th Grade

Chemistry (H) & (CP): Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson

Environmental Science: No One is Too Small to Make a Difference by Greta Thunberg

Women in Medicine: When Breath Becomes Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi

Year 3 Neumann Scholars: When Breath Becomes Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi

PLTW: N/A


12th Grade

Chemistry: Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson

Environmental Science: No One is Too Small to Make a Difference by Greta Thunberg

AP Biology: The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic by Steven Johnson

Biology II (H): The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic by Steven Johnson

Physics (H): What If by Randall Munroe


WIM: Senior Project


PLTW: Senior Project

The math department has designed assignments to help you practice prerequisite skills needed for each course or to provide you with an introduction to the course, and a PDF of each course’s assignment is

available on the website. Please note the directions and due date for your course- in general work is being collected at Orientation.

Summer work is posted for the following courses:

Algebra I & Honors Algebra I (with Algebra Resource Guide)

Geometry & Honors Geometry

Algebra II

Honors Algebra II

Introductory to Pre-Calculus

Honors Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC

Statistics

Finite Math

AP Psychology

Mindset by Carol S. Dweck

9thGrade United States HistoryHonors and College Prep  

 In preparation for a year of United States History, we ask you to take time this summer to collect an oral history – stories from a first-hand perspective.  In other words, you will act as a historian would collecting primary source information from one adult in your life.  Interviews can be done over the phone, in person, or over another communication platform such as FaceTime.  Consider asking the person you are interviewing to send you a photo of an artifact that represents a pivotal moment in their life linked to a historical event.    

  

1. Determine who you will interview.  You must interview one adult in your life – mom/dad, grandmother/grandfather, aunt or uncle, mentor.  

 2. Interview questions – use the following questions to collect an oral history.  Be sure you are taking notes and if you decide to record the interview, you must have written permission from your interviewee.  Keep your notes as you will need to turn in this documentation at the start of the school year.  

 First, collect demographic information.  Name, birth year, profession, etc. Then ask what three pivotal events in history your interviewee has lived through.  Follow the same set of questions for each event.  

·   What pivotal historical events have you lived through?  Ask the following questions for each of the three events the interviewee discusses.   

·       How old were you when the event happened?   

·       What was your life like before the pivotal event?  

·       What were the immediate consequences/effects of the event? 

·       What were the lasting consequences, if any? 

·       How did people close to you feel about the event? 

·       What was public opinion about the event? 

·       How did the event make you feel? 

·       Did the event change or impact you personally in a lasting way? 

3.  After you have collected this oral history, carefully review your notes.   

4.  Write a summary of your interview.  Include an explanation of who you interviewed and why you decided to collect an oral history from this person.  Your summary should also include a brief description of the three pivotal events in history your interviewee lived through.  Finally, what pivotal moment in history have you, the student, lived through so far.  Describe how this event has impacted you.   


10th Grade World History Honors and College Prep:  

In preparation for the first semester of Social Studies in the Sophomore year, we ask that you research a world historical event and conduct an interview with an individual that has a recollection of the event and report on your findings.

Choose one of the following world historical events:

The Cuban Missile Crisis                    The Moon Landing

The Jonestown Massacre                    Overthrow and Ethiopian Monarch Haile Selassie I

The Vietnam War                               The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre

The Camp David Accords                  The Iran Hostage Crisis

The First or Second Intifada               The Fall of the Berlin Wall & German Reunification

The Break-up of the Soviet Union      Chernobyl Or Fukushima Nuclear Disasters

1979 Energy Crisis                             Death of Pope John Paul II, Selection of Pope Benedict XVI

Tiananmen Square Protests                 The Rwanda Genocide

The Bosnian War                                The Gulf War

Live Aid                                              The Challenger Explosion

The Good Friday Agreement              TWA 800 Crash

The Congo Wars, 1996-2003              Salvadorean Civil War

1993 World Trade Center Bombing   Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

Beirut Barracks Bombing                   Overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende

Nelson Mandela & the end of South African Apartheid

World Trade Organization and Anti-globalization Protests, Seattle, 1999

                                                           

Select one or more potential interviewees and ask them if they have any strong and clear memories about any of these world historical events.  One you have chosen an interviewee and a world historical event, please complete the following:

  1. Preliminary Research: Conduct research on your chosen world historical event.  Be sure to access primary sources like magazines, newspapers, first-hand accounts, images, material culture, and news reports. Your research should familiarize you with the event and give you enough information to compose at least two specific questions to ask your interviewee, along with the following fixed questions:

“What memories do you have about [world historical event].”

“What impact do you think [world historical event] had on this country and the World.”

“[additional pre-set question]

 

  1. The Interview: Interview the person you selected.  Interviews can be done over the phone, in person, or over another communication platform such as FaceTime.  Be sure to ask your interviewee the pre-set questions as well as the two additional questions that you composed from your research. Feel free to ask additional questions if they come up during the interview.

 

  1. The Report: To complete the project include the following:

 

    1. Create a historical overview for your event (approximately one page) describing the world historical event and its international importance. 
    2. A transcript of your interview.
    3. A reflection on the world historical event and how your interviewees’ experience puts the event in a personal and historical perspective.
    4. An annotated research list including the sources used and a brief entry on the source and its value to your research.

 

 11th Grade College Prep United States History II and Honors AP United States History 

  

In preparation for a year of United States History, we ask you to take time this summer to collect an oral history – stories from a first-hand perspective.  In other words, you will act as a historian would collecting primary source information from one adult in your life.  Interviews can be done over the phone, in person, or over another communication platform such as FaceTime.  Consider asking the person you are interviewing to send you a photo of an artifact that represents a pivotal moment in their life linked to a historical event.    

  

·                Determine who you will interview.  You must interview one adult in your life – mom/dad, grandmother/grandfather, aunt or uncle, mentor.  

 

·                Interview questions – use the following questions to collect an oral history.  Be sure you are taking notes and if you decide to record the interview, you must have written permission from your interviewee.  Keep your notes as you will need to turn in this documentation at the start of the school year.  

 

First, collect demographic information.  Name, birth year, profession, etc. Then ask what three pivotal events in history your interviewee has lived through.  Follow the same set of questions for each event.  

 

·       What pivotal historical events have you lived through?  Ask the following questions for each of the three events the interviewee discusses.   

·       How old were you when the event happened?   

·       What was your life like before the pivotal event?  

·       What were the immediate consequences/effects of the event? 

·       What were the lasting consequences, if any? 

·       How did people close to you feel about the event? 

·       What was public opinion about the event? 

·       How did the event make you feel? 

·       Did the event change or impact you personally in a lasting way? 

 

·       After you have collected this oral history, carefully review your notes.   

·       Write a summary of your interview.  Include an explanation of who you interviewed and why you decided to collect an oral history from this person.  Your summary should also include a brief description of the three pivotal events in history your interviewee lived through.  Finally, what pivotal moment in history have you, the student, lived through so far.  Describe how this event has impacted you.   

 

TIPS FOR CONDUCTING AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW 

 

1. Have a list of start-up questions to ask to get your interview going and get both you and the interviewee comfortable.   

2. Do plan the topic and form of your first substantial question after the "settling down" phase. Ask a question that will prompt a long answer and "get the subject going."   

3. Ask easy questions first, such as brief biographical questions. “Where and when were you born?”   

4. After the biographical questions and once you are both “settled in” to the interview, ask an open-ended question that will prompt a long answer and the interviewee talking.   

5. Unless you want one-word answers, phrase your questions so that they can't be answered with a simple "yes" or "no." Don’t ask, "Were you a farmer on Denny Hill during the 1930s?" Ask instead, "What was it like farming up on Denny Hill during the 1930s?" Think “essay questions” more than “true/false” or “multiple choice.”   

6. Ask questions one at a time.   

7. Allow silence to work for you. Wait.   

8. Be a good listener. If interviewing in person or through video, use body language such as looking at the interviewee, nodding, and smiling to encourage and give the message, "I am interested." 

 

9. If necessary, use verbal encouragement such as "This is wonderful information!" or "How interesting!" Be careful, however, not to speak at the same time that the interviewee is speaking, such as saying “uh huh” to encourage them.   

10. Ask for specific examples if the interviewee makes a general statement and you need to know more. Or you might say, "I don't understand. Could you explain that in more detail?"   

11. Ask follow-up questions and then ask some more.   

12. Be flexible. Watch for and pick up on promising topics introduced by the interviewee, even if the topics are not on your interview guide sheet.